10 Countries To Easily Immigrate To From The Philippines

Last May 13 a particular topic went quite viral as Google Trends showed a spike in searches for the words ‘migrate’ and ‘how to migrate’. Tweets and Facebook posts which used ‘migrate’ also steadily increased around the same time. While many of these were probably made as jokes, we’ve put together a list of 10 countries with relatively open immigration policies — just in case. 

10. The United States of America

The US remains the top choice of Filipinos looking to migrate. Immigrants from South America and other parts of Asia hold it in the same high regard. This is largely due to that promise of an ‘American dream’ and being a ‘land of opportunity’. However, recent popular sentiment has shifted against the immigrant population with their own political arena experiencing a crisis. 

To apply for permanent residence you must either be related to a US Citizen or a green card holder or have secured employment with a U.S. company. Special working and student visas may also be applied for. 

9. Canada 

View this post on Instagram

Have you ever visited the Old Port of Montreal (@vieuxportmtl)? Back in the early 1600s, the port was a strategic trading post. Four hundred years later, it has become a hub for Montreal locals and visitors. A few of our favourite spots to check out in the area include: the Montreal Science Centre (@centredessciences), Bota Bota Spa (@botabotamtl), and the Old Montreal Ferris Wheel. We also love to explore by foot, bike (and sometimes by Segway too) the 2-kilometre waterfront that stretches of town along the peaceful St. Lawrence River. #ExploreCanada 📷: @loicromer 📍: @vieuxportmtl, @montreal, @tourismequebec . Abonnez-vous à @explorezsansfin pour voir nos publications en français! . #Montreal #MtlMoments #Mpring #OldMontreal #Quebec #oldportmtl #Quebecoriginal

A post shared by Explore Canada (@explorecanada) on

Canada is typically known as one of the most immigration-friendly countries in the world. As a small and aging population, they have one of the laxest immigration policies and also readily accept refugees. Plus, there is that stereotype of them just being incredibly nice. 

They have several different immigration programs which you might be eligible for, like the Skilled Workers Program, the Immigrant Investors Program, and the Family Sponsorship Program among others. 

8. France

France’s recent win in the FIFA World Cup was significant of the fact that it is a nation being built by immigrants. Although generally regarded as ‘snobbish’, France is actually one of the countries which accept the highest number of immigrants. The recent turn in political tides with their ‘yellow vest protests’ is a definite factor to consider, though. 

Without an EU passport, you would first need to apply for a residence permit and “display skills and talents that make you valuable to the country.” 

7. Japan

Photo from Lonely Planet

If you’ve ever wanted to live out your best anime life, then Japan is the answer. Stepping foot on Nihongo soil is almost like stepping foot into any anime set in Japan, with its quaint streets and eccentric personality completely captured. However, the contrast of behaviors can prove too much of culture shock for some migrants.

Japan is actually opening up several more slots for individuals interested to work in Japan, as well as scholarship opportunities for college and graduate students. 

6. Ecuador

Though Ecuador is geographically far away from the Philippines its cultural influences from Spain will aid in making it feel more like home. Its diverse landscape and green scenery are said to make it a ‘romantic’ destination. However, their chronic violations of human rights and vulnerable environment may diminish that designation. 

To immigrate you only need to show a guaranteed income of $800/month, with an additional $100/month for each of your dependents. It is called the ‘pensioners visa’, so the income doesn’t necessarily have to come from employment. 

CONTINUE READING ON THE NEXT PAGE


Pages: 1 2





Related Stories