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7 Places in the Philippines to Disconnect: Why a (Temporary) Break-up from the Internet is Healthy

 2.) Puzzle Gourmet Store and Cafe

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle

Puzzle 

Comfort Food + Gourmet Items + Café. These are the three things that make Puzzle Cafe unique.  It’s a great place to dine because of the food, but also because of the puzzles and board games you could enjoy. It is the first autism-friendly cafe in the Philippines, where servers with autism are taught how to cook, man the cashier, and entertain the guests. 

Great food, great ambiance, great boardgames, and even great service. All that in one restaurant: Puzzle Gourmet Store and Cafe!

1.) Dyce N Dyne

Dyce and Dyne

dycendyne

Dyce n Dyne When in Manila Board Games Frank Ruaya Mae Ilagan-19

Dyce n Dyne When in Manila Board Games Frank Ruaya Mae Ilagan-79

Dyce n Dyne When in Manila Board Games Frank Ruaya Mae Ilagan-25

Dyce and Dyne is a new restaurant in Pasig that has been drawing crowds because of its food, drinks, cozy ambiance, and a huge selection of board games that you could use for free.They even have resident game masters whenever you visit. Most people get really bored reading the manuals, so it’s really convenient to learn the instructions as you play along. Their meals are relatively cheap (PhP 150- PhP 330) and delicious. Milk tea and coffee lovers will also have a difficult time choosing which drink to order.

The overall feel of the place is fun and interactive. With all the people to play with and the friendly staff who are willing to assist you with your meals or with your games, you surely wouldn’t miss your Wi-Fi when you’re in Dyce and Dyne.

These seven places are great places to unwind and disconnect. You could visit them alone or with a group of loved ones you would like to spend undisturbed time with. In an age where technology does so many things for us, shouldn’t we have more time to unwind instead of being on call for work 24/7?

But instead of dropping our phones permanently, writer and Slow Movement advocate Carl Honoré wrote, “Instead of using Blackberrys, laptops, and cell phones to extend the workday, we can use them to rearrange it.”