LOOK: This Photo of Uptown in BGC was Featured in National Geographic Your Shot

In case you don’t follow National Geographic Your Shot (@natgeoyourshot) on Instagram yet, it is basically an Instagram account under National Geographic that considers itself as a photo community, where photographers can come together to tell their stories.

Recently, they featured a photo of the Uptown area in BGC, Taguig entitled Urban Jungle submitted by Your Shot photographer Jarrett Laabs (@jarrett_laabs) to the Climate Action in Your Community Assignment. The photo was taken from his condo balcony on the 45th floor. “The UN Environment Program confirmed that buildings use almost half of all global energy,” Jarrett shares. “They also produce 40% of greenhouse gas emissions, consume 25% of all drinkable water and account for 20% of all solid waste produced in developed countries. Architects are responding with sustainable designs with “green roofs” to reduce energy consumption and combat climate change giving rise to a new take on the urban jungle.”

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Urban Jungle | Photograph by Jarrett Laabs (@jarrett_laabs) // #sponsored by @bloombergdotorg // “I took this photo from my condo balcony on the 45th floor,” writes Your Shot photographer Jarreet Laabs. “The UN Environment Program confirmed that buildings use almost half of all global energy. They also produce 40% of greenhouse gas emissions, consume 25% of all drinkable water and account for 20% of all solid waste produced in developed countries. Architects are responding with sustainable designs with “green roofs” to reduce energy consumption and combat climate change giving rise to a new take on the urban jungle.” This image was submitted to the Climate Action in Your Community assignment. // Check out @paristopittsburgh to learn more about how communities across America are coming together to act on climate change. #ParistoPittsburgh

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Eloisa V, a friend of the photographer, says that she thinks it’s cool that our architects are keeping climate change in mind when they do their work. She also hopes that this practice will be replicated in other infrastructures. “It’s good that these architects’ initiatives were acknowledged by NatGeo,” she adds. “Hopefully, it will be acknowledged by more Filipinos, as well.”

Jarrett Laabs has already had many of his photos of different places in the Philippines published by National Geographic. See more of his work at http://www.jarrettlaabsimages.com and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/JarrettLaabsImages






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